15 Baby Dinosaurs Discovered in a Crowded Nest

15 baby dinosaurs discovered in a nest in the heart of Gobi Desert, Mongolia. It seems the baby dinosaurs overcrowded the nest waiting for their mother to come searching for food. They are about 4 to 6 inches long and no more than a year old.

The discovery of baby dinosaurs added unbelievable information and photos to the already known Tugrikin Shire where lots of fossils buried. One amazing example of discovery among paleontologists is the fighting dinosaurs seem lock-up in mortal combat – the Velociraptor and the Protoceratops.

Scientists confirmed those 15 baby dinosaurs were cousins of Triceratops and they are called Protoceratops andrewsi. These were the plant-eating dinosaurs about the size of a sheep with frill at the back of their head forming unique decoration.

It seems this group of baby dinosaurs was buried alive in a sandstorm that overrun them during rustic conditions. Gobi Desert during those times were windblown dune field that is about 80 feet high when sandstorm burst. The harsh reality of environment for living dinosaurs that exist 70 million years ago.

It was found out that Protoceratops, a kind of dinosaurs that will taking care of their young at the early stages of life. But the presence of harsh environment mortality is high that is difficult for them to survive in a later stages of life.

protoceratops nest

Credit: K. Tsogtbaatar


A nest of a dinosaur named Protoceratops andrewsi, a sheep-sized plant-eater related to Triceratops, was discovered in the Gobi Desert in Mongolia. The nest conatained the remains of 15 infant dinosaurs.

protoceratops nest

Credit: K. Tsogtbaatar


The infants in the nest were about 4-6 inches (10-15 centimeters) long and likely no more than 1 year old, according to researcher David Fastovsky, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Rhode Island.

protoceratops nest

Credit: K. Tsogtbaatar


Another close-up view of one of the Protoceratops infants discovered in the Gobi Desert nest.

protoceratops nest

Credit: Lars Schmitz


Known for the frill at the back of its head, Protoceratops andrewsi was a sheep-sized plant-eater that lived about 70 million years ago.

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